Welcome to Mr Bob’s Blog!

BOBWelcome to Mr Bob’s Blog!

Welcome to Mr Bob’s Blog!  This is an adventure in interacting with YOU, so we can get acquainted, share experiences, and have fun together. Hit the “Reply” button and share your experience or comment on what I’ve written.

The Blog idea started with a question posed at my 80th birthday party. “80 years old?  Really?  How did you get to be 80?”

I answered the question by sharing how God has protected, provided for, and “pushed” me through the years to prepare me for His purpose to be a children’s author.  I sensed a feeling of purpose when I discovered that my gift for rhyming can help children learn to read.

I’ll add some unique experiences that most people wouldn’t know about that gave my life extra adventure and additional value.  And I’d like to hear what adventures and experiences have added value to YOUR life!

Let’s throw in fun things along the way – to build a “community”, or “family” of people who love the Lord and are enjoying life.

“Reply” and let’s enjoy the journey!

100. Four Frog Concert in the Lily Pool

100.  Four Frog Concert in the Lily Pool

There was a giant sweet cherry tree on the south border of the yard, and a butternut tree way at the southwest end of the back yard.  The huge maple tree between the house and the garage brushed the tall willow tree.  The weeps of the willow tree stretched low trying to reach the round lily pool in the center of the yard.

Every spring, we took the tarps off the lily pool and dug out the straw to revive the hibernating frogs and pink lilies that bloomed in the summer.  When we filled the shallow pool with water, the green lily pads would quickly cover the surface.  There were always frogs in the lily pool.  I would lie on my stomach by the pool, and watch the frogs peeking out from between the pads and jumping to catch bugs flying by.

 

FOUR FROG CONCERT

Four frogs sitting on a lily pad,
Singing songs both sweet and sad.
They sang in beautiful harmony,
‘Til one jumped off and there were three.

Three frogs singing on a lily pad,
Got way off key and sounded bad.
They croaked and croaked, “What shall we do?”
So one jumped off and there were two.

Two frogs sitting on a lily pad,
Sang happy songs that made them glad.
Delightful duets made the evening fun.
Then one jumped off and there was one.

One frog sitting on a lily pad,
Sang three solos, that’s all he had.
He jumped from the pad, then there were none.
The four-frog lily pool concert was done.

Christmas Memories

Christmas Memories

Christmas was always the big family event of the year, with Christmas Eve as the most exciting part for me.  Soon after Thanksgiving, we would go to a tree farm and buy a fresh cut tree, usually eight to ten feet tall to set up near the front window in the living room.

We fussed with the strings of lights because all the bulbs had to be good for the string to light.  My sister Jan and I decorated the tree with many colored balls and dangling ornaments, and strands of icicles.  We had a special antique angel for the top.  The family was completed when my aunt Viva pulled in the driveway a few days before the big day, honking the horn to herald her arrival.  Christmas Eve tradition began with kidney bean stew for supper.  The stew was made ahead, so Mom wouldn’t be tied up in the kitchen.

Our gift giving tradition was to “fish” for small inexpensive gifts.  Mom said that Grandma started the tradition during the Depression when there wasn’t much money for gifts.  All the wrapped gifts were piled on the pool table in the front room, and a sheet tacked up over the door.  We tied a string on a “fishing pole” to throw over the sheet.  Someone would hook a gift on the string and call for the recipient to come “fish” it out while everyone watched to see what they got.  With many small gifts, the giving could be stretched out for the whole evening.

The gifts also became a tradition.  I always gave Mom a box of #2 lead pencils and packs of Wrigley’s Spearmint gum — individually wrapped, of course.  I tied the pencils in a long string.  I always gave my sister Jan a can of cashews, and Daddy a bottle of after shave lotion; usually Old Spice or Bay Rum.  Daddy got paperback books, and Zane Grey westerns or Agatha Christi mysteries.

We vied to see who would notice the passing of midnight, and be the first to wish everyone a Merry Christmas.  Then we hung our stockings on the mantle over the fireplace and waded through the mounds of wrapping paper to go to bed.  Christmas morning I was up early!  I snuck out to once again try to shout “Merry Christmas” before someone else did.  First stop was to see what goodies were in my stocking; maybe a candy bar or a small jackknife.
Mom was already up preparing Christmas dinner for the midday.  Normal days we ate in the kitchen, but today we ate on the big table in the dining room.  Mom usually boiled two of our own chickens, and dropped dumplings on top of them.  I loved those dumplings and gravy! The rest was traditional, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and apple pie or pumpkin pie for dessert.

Finally, it was time to clean up the Christmas Eve mess.  We gathered all the torn wrapping paper still piled in the living room, and put away our gifts.  The tree stayed up until New Year’s Day.  Either Christmas Eve or the end of Christmas Day, or both, Mom would sit down at the old upright piano, and we gathered around to sing Christmas carols.

Sigh. Christmas was over.  Now, the long wait until next year.  The wonderful memories lingered as we ate leftover chicken and pie and kidney bean stew.

What special memories of Christmas do you have from your childhood?

What are your favorite Christmas traditions?

The Mouse Who Saved Christmas

      THE MOUSE WHO SAVED CHRISTMAS

                          By Robert Z. Hicks

T’was the night before Christmas, and all through the house,
Not a creature was stirring, except for a mouse.
He crept to the kitchen and stopped by a chair,
To nibble at breadcrumbs that had tumbled down there.

The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of candy canes danced in their heads.
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that Saint Nicholas would soon be there.

When up on the housetop there rose such a clatter,
The mouse jumped in alarm and thought, “What’s the matter?”
Down through the chimney came a round little man,
With a bright red suit and a Florida tan.

Over his shoulder was a bag full of toys,
Dolls for the girls, and games for the boys.
Out in the kitchen, still tarrying there,
The mouse heard a scuffle and sounds of despair.

He ran down the hall to a terrible scene,
Santa tangled in cobwebs from last Halloween!
Caught like a fly, he turned and he twisted,
The more to be tangled, the more he resisted.

The mouse was dismayed by an awful thought,
“What will happen to Christmas if Santa stays caught?”
No thought for his safety, he knew what to do,
He leaped to the cobwebs and began to chew.

His teeth flashed in the light from the Christmas tree,
And in no time at all, he had chewed Santa free.
“Oh thank you kind sir,” said Santa to the mouse.
“You’ve saved me, and Christmas, so for you and your spouse,

I’ve two pounds of cheese and chocolates to share,
And a castle to live in under the stair.”
Santa dished out the presents in the blink of an eye,
Then whisked up the chimney with a wink for goodbye.

Stars twinkled above as he jumped to his sleigh,
“Up Dancer, up Prancer, let’s be on our way.
Merry Christmas,” Santa called, as he zoomed out of sight.
“Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night!”

Merry Christmas 2017

MERRY CHRISTMAS 2017

Blog followers have asked how I can remember all the things I share about on the Blog entries.  My secret is that we have on file 51 years of annual Christmas newsletters highlighting our newsworthy activities of the year.  So you can see a sample, this year I’m sending you our Christmas greeting via the Blog.

In the July of last year, I was in the hospital with a heart attack and two heart arteries completely blocked.  My cardiologist told me that I am his “miracle patient” for 2016, “We did not think you would make it.”  The Echocardiogram last week showed my heart functioning at 50% output – normal is 50% to 70%.  Last year in the hospital, my heart was at 15% – so I guess I am a documented “miracle”!

I came home under Hospice care, and this past March 20th, I was discharged from Hospice care.  I was improving, and no longer qualified for Medicare support.

Last year I reported that Ashley was half way done with the illustrations for my next book, Danny the Dragon.  Illustrations done, I chose to go with Christian Faith Publishing, a hybrid publisher.  Danny has passed their editor’s desk, and is now in Page Design for formatting/typesetting, as they work the book through their system.

Ashley did a cover, so after the publisher makes a trailer and a website landing page for ordering, Danny the Dragon can be ordered via Barnes and Noble online, or on Amazon. Danny will be available in paperback, hardcover, or e-book.  WHEN, we do not know, but February is a guess.  I’ll send out a letter as soon as we know.

On my Blog entries which you have been getting, I’ve started a new series, a flashback to my youth growing up on the farm north of Ionia Michigan. I’ll continue sharing episodes from my unpublished book, Once I Was A Kid, With the Wild Things On Grandpa’s Farm, and perhaps throw in some other memories.

Ionia friends from high school days may have visited the place back then.  Spark some memories, and stay with me as I reminisce about days of my youth on the farm.  My nephew Kim is still there, maintaining the place.

Thanksgiving week, we had a young couple for lunch who are missionaries in Zambia, Africa – here in the US for furlough and to raise support.   “Home” for them is a tent in a base camp on the edge of civilization three hours by jeep from Lusaka, the capital of Zambia.  From the base camp they go out to villages with a translator to teach locals how to farm “God’s Way,” and to witness of the gospel of Jesus Christ.  They train locals to be pastors, then they can move on.  The pastors they train also learn how to raise vegetables to sell, so they can be self-sufficient without a job interfering with their work.

They shared a video of catching a cobra that had gotten in their shower.  I now appreciate the security of our house all the more, although we did have some toads get in.

Most of all this year, I thank God that I am alive!  I thank you and all the people who prayed for me, and all those who came to help me from Hospice, and The Crossroads Church, and neighbors.

I can look forward to wishing you a Happy New Year, and share again with you next year!  Be blessed, and celebrate the birth of Christ, and have a happy year ahead.

The Blog is interactive!  I’d love to hear from you by comment or email.

Bob & Betty

Christmas Special Offer

Christmas Special Offer

The perfect gift for children of all ages for Christmas — a rhyming story picture book by Robert Z. Hicks!

Mouse in the Manger is the Christmas story told by Micah the mouse who was a secret observer of the birth of Christ.  Beautiful illustrations by Ashley Otis brings the Christmas story to life.

 

Tommie Turtle’s Secret is a beautiful hardcover picture book.  Tommie’s secret is revealed in this fun rhyming story of the day he raced Speedy Hoppy Bunny to teach the bunny valuable lessons about friendship.

My special offer is buy 2 books for $20 and get a third book FREE!  Choose any combination of the two books.

You can view a video of both books, and get all the details to order at www.dannythedragon.info    (If you are curious about our website address – take a look)

Local friends: You can order by calling us and coming to pick up your books.  727-842-8314

99. Springtime Symphony in the Apple Orchard

99.  Springtime Symphony in the Apple Orchard

Across a small open field south of the house there was an old orchard with big gnarled apple trees. I would sneak through the tall grass in the orchard, and hide and dream under the trees.

 

SPRINGTIME SYMPHONY

The black bug sat in the apple tree,
Strumming a banjo on his knee.
He sang a love song melody,
To a ladybug as pretty as a bug could be.

While he sang the beautiful melody,
A beetle added harmony.
A grasshopper fiddled and fiddled with glee,
Rubbing his legs enthusiastically.

They all sang high in the key of C,
With the bass notes hummed by a bumblebee.
They sang of Bonnie over the sea,
Of Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee.

They sang of life’s sweet mystery,
Of battles fought and victory.
They sang of the West that used to be,
With pulsing rhythm and poetry.

Sometimes they sang a little off key,
With marvelous creativity.
The butterflies danced so prettily,
In a swirling aerial fantasy.

I close my eyes for the memory,
To relive that childhood reverie;
Of a wonderful springtime symphony,
And a boy in the grass ‘neath the apple tree.

98. Once I Was a Kid – The Farm

98.  Once I Was a Kid – The Farm

It was 1942.  Pearl Harbor was attacked the previous December, and the United States was at war.  For a seven year old boy, a move from “Big City Detroit” to my grandparent’s farm in the country near Ionia Michigan, was like moving almost to heaven.

The farm was a wonderful place to be seven.  “One hundred sixty acres,” Mom said.  The house, barn and buildings were on forty acres west of Michigan Highway 66 that ran north and south dividing the property.  East of the highway was 120 acres of fields divided by a lane that stretched to distant trees.

The house was a big old, two-story farmhouse my grandfather built at the turn of the twentieth century, finishing about 1903.  Mom said that Grandpa had somehow used work horses to combine three houses to make the house.

The bigger part of the house had three bedrooms upstairs, three bedrooms downstairs, and a living room with a front door that was rarely used.  The smaller part housed the kitchen, dining room, and an unheated work room we called the “back room,” which had a back door and porch.  There was an attic over the kitchen.  The kitchen door was our main entrance.

Two tall pines stood guard on the front lawn; and two more at the northeast corner of the house next to the rock garden that spilled down from the north porch.  When we turned in the dirt driveway, there was a waist high trellis on the left where vines grew up each summer and gave us juicy blue grapes.

The driveway curved behind the back porch and by the front of Grandpa’s big shop building.   It went almost one hundred yards; past the windmill and a big sweet cherry tree, to the granary and the barn, where it turned back out to the highway.

The garage was attached to the side of the shop, and a tiny brick chicken coop sat in the shade of a tall mulberry tree behind the garage.  Daddy later built a big chicken coop connecting the back of the garage to the brick coop.

Big maple trees by the driveway and behind the house framed the picture-postcard view of the grassy field to the West, with the green lawn of the backyard in the foreground.  A huge old weeping willow tree was the centerpiece and backdrop for the view from the kitchen window.  The branch on the side toward the house had been cut off to provide an unobstructed view.

It was in this setting that I had more delightful experiences while growing up than a small boy could ever imagine.

97. Once I Was a Kid – Introduction

Blog 97.  Once I Was A Kid – Introduction

Hello Blog followers:  I am turning back the clock to my childhood to share events in my life from age seven to about twelve or so, when we lived on my grandparent’s farm.  I’ll be sharing the episodes that comprise my unpublished book, Once I Was A Kid, With the Wild Things On Grandpa’s Farm.

Here is what my editor wrote about the book for the back cover:

In “Once I Was a Kid,” Robert Z. Hicks shares stories from his childhood adventures growing up on a farm in Michigan during the ’40’s.  Whether or not you lived in that era, and whether or not you lived on a farm, you will love the warm and humorous stories from Bob’s memories.  Bob’s encounters with cows, bees, birds, raccoons, skunks, and many more of God’s creatures will entertain both children and adults.  His sometimes hilarious encounters with God’s creatures will stir your imagination.

In between the stories, Bob treats us with his gift for rhyme with humorous, poignant, and delightful rhyming stories written as he relished the memories from his childhood.  Step back in time and imagine when life was sweet and innocent, and sometimes spiced with a bit of mischief here and there.

Imagine too, the lessons Bob learned from Mom and his experiences, that imagination and empathy are key skills for good relationships and communication, and that God’s creatures are born to be free.

It all began when…

I raised my foot to stomp on the ants on the big rock by the house, when Mom grabbed my arm and said, “Wait!  How would you feel if you looked up to see that giant shoe coming down on you?”  I squinted my eyes shut as I looked up into the bright summer sky, and imagined the bottom of my tennis shoe gradually filling the sky above me. Scary!

Mom and I got down on our hands and knees and watched the ants going back and forth.  She asked, “What do you suppose those ants are doing?   Look at that one, he’s carrying something.  Maybe it’s food for the queen.  Imagine how important you would feel if you were carrying food for the queen!”

Yes!  Imagine!  Imagine, indeed!  My lifelong journey with imagination, and empathy for God’s living things had begun.

Ode to the Toads

It all started a couple of weeks ago when a toad showed up in our shower. Betty had a wild time chasing him around the shower with a paper cup in order to evict him.  Next night — and the next, there was a toad again in the shower.  Then Betty found one in the toilet, and one jumped down from the wall.  Betty evicted them all, out the front door.  We may never know how they got in the bathroom.

Now, when it gets dark, and coincidently, when we sit down for dinner, five toads gather on the window by the dining table to catch insects attracted by the light.  We, especially Betty, delight in watching them wait motionless, and suddenly jump to grab something.  Are they the same five toads that were in the bathroom?  No way to know; but, at least they are outside.

                                       ODE TO THE TOADS

 

 

 

 

 

Five toads on our window,
What did they do?
They tried to catch bugs and millers to chew.
And sometimes they caught a mosquito or two.

They joined us for dinner, and to have dinner too.
We watched them eat; did they watch us too?
They hung upright, sideways, and inverted askew.
Whatever it took, to be where bugs flew.

Our time was up, and dinner was through,
We left the table, and the toads left too.
The toads left the window; maybe they knew,
Dinnertime was over, no more bugs to pursue.

Five toads on our window,
What did they do?
They entertained us for dinner; that much we knew.
Why they leave when we do, we don’t have a clue.

 

96. Looking Back

96.  Looking Back

Betty and I lived in Hawaii twenty-four years where I taught at the University of Hawaii, first at the Hilo Campus, then two years at the main campus on Oahu, and then seventeen years at the Windward Community College in Kaneohe.  Here are some of the things we experienced that stand out in my memory.

We stood on the rim of an erupting volcano — at midnight!  We boarded a WWII pocket submarine in Hilo Bay to give the sailors some pineapples.  The Lord’s provision for housing was free house-sitting on Halai Hill overlooking the town, and at the end, very cheap housing in a condemned building right on Hilo Bay next to the hotels on Banyan Drive.

On Oahu, we snorkeled in the warm waters of Waikiki, and above a giant manta ray bigger than I am at Hanauma Bay.  I watched a giant humpback whale breach just offshore of Sea Life Park on the south end of Oahu.  We sailed in our small boat alongside dolphins off Waikiki.  We ate lunch at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, and danced to the live music of Trummy Young at the top floor nightclub at the Ala Moana Hotel.  The Lord provided us elegant free house-sitting in a mansion at the top of Tantalus Mountain, overlooking Honolulu and Pearl Harbor.

Betty and I helped found and manage Christian Vision, the music ministry of Randy and Gay Hongo.  Christian Vision has supported them to travel around the world singing and spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ, and making many recordings of their music.  Being connected with Randy and Gay gave us the fun of meeting Waikiki entertainers, and having breakfast with Billy Graham.

Our doctor introduced us to the industry of network marketing which opened the way for a world of adventures we never would have imagined.  Amway gave us an opportunity for personal growth, meeting uplifting positive people, and fun trips such as to a resort on Orcas Island.

Sunrider provided opportunities to travel and to earn extra perks.  We qualified for a trip to Taiwan and Hong Kong.  We climbed the Great Wall of China!  We walked where the emperors of China walked in Forbidden City.  We watched as a typhoon buffeted Hong Kong, and savored exotic cuisine aboard the Jumbo Floating Restaurant in Aberdeen Harbor.

The owners of Sunrider loved cruises for leadership conferences.  We earned the requirements for five cruises.  We cruised the Caribbean aboard ships to Cozumel, Grand Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Belize, Costa Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands where we chartered a sailboat to sail and snorkel at St. John.  We had two cruises down the Mexican Riviera, from Cabo San Lucas to Puerto Vallarta.  Finally, we got to see both the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean in the same day by transiting the Panama Canal.

Everyone who does a network marketing business hopes to make a lot of money, but we learned that the real secret of network marketing is the experience:  the journey, and building relationships with positive ambitious people – not the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Betty and I continue to enjoy the relationships we’ve made, and are making, with the company we are with now.  Good health is our passion, and we gravitate to companies that make nutritional products from the plants that God has provided.

God has provided, protected, and pushed us through a lifetime of amazing experiences!

Looking Back:  The last time we went back to Hawaii, we stood at the edge of the cliff looking down into Haunama Bay, our favorite snorkeling spot, enjoying the vista of the half-moon beach, and the gentle waves spilling over the reef.  We spotted the channel where we swam through the reef to visit the schools of flashing fish that hovered and fed above the coral heads outside the reef wall.

Just a few feet from our faces, a couple of Brazilian Cardinals hung tenaciously to a swaying branch in a bush buffeted by the strong ocean breeze.  As I pointed my camera, they turned their bright red heads to the sea, and their backs to me.  That picture will remind me, that to hang on, we must face the buffeting forces of life, because ahead of us is where we’ll live, not behind us.  Treasured memories are the “pictures” looking back – but life is lived to the fullest facing into the winds of today and tomorrows!

God has provided, protected, and pushed us through a lifetime of amazing experiences, and I know He will continue to do so as we face the winds of tomorrows!